NEPHSTROM celebrates International Clinical Trials Day with the HRB-TMRN

EU funded projects NEPHSTROM, VISICORTADIPOA-2, and AUTOSTEM coordinated by the Regenerative Medicine Institute (REMEDI) at National University of Ireland, Galway exhibited at a unique outreach activity targeted at primary school students. The event called the START competition was the brainchild of the Health Research Board (Ireland)’s Trials Methodology Research Network (HRB-TMRN) in Galway. In celebration of International Clinical Trials Day and to draw attention to clinical research conducted in Ireland, young people were invited to design, conduct and report on a randomized clinical trial. On May 18, 2018, three of the short-listed schools assembled at the University in Galway to visit interactive exhibitions, talk with researchers, perform mini-experiments, take part in lively science demonstrations and collect their prizes. The winning school was St. Joseph’s National School from Kinvara, County Galway.

Special thanks to Dr Siobhan Gaughan who organized the stand, Georgina Shaw who prepared the stem cell plates and to NUI Galway volunteers Dr Tina Harte, Dr Cathal Ó Flatharta, Dr. Nahidul Islam, Hannah Egan, Niamh Leonard, Dr. Emily Growney Kalaf, Claire Dooley and Dulan Hasantha Jayasooriya who volunteered their time to work with the young people on behalf of the EU funded project, STEM promotion.  The STEMinator cards used at the exhibition were designed by Cúram, NUI Galway. Also thank you to Lauren, Alibhe and Charlotte for creating the stem cell models.

Read more about the START competition here.

Nephstrom study published in Immunology & Cell Biology

A National University of Ireland Galway REMEDI-Cúram-NEPHSTROM- funded study ‘Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of human intermediate monocytes based on HLA-DR expression’ has been recently published in Immunology & Cell Biology. The body of research by Connaughton EPNaicker SHanley SASlevin SMEykelenboom JKLowndes NFO’Brien TCeredig RGriffin MD, and Dennedy MC was published on 5 March 2018.

 

Abstract

Human blood monocytes are sub-classified as classical, intermediate and non-classical. In this study, it was shown that conventionally-defined human intermediate monocytes (IM) can be divided into two distinct subpopulations with mid- and high-level surface expression of HLA-DR (referred to as DRmid and DRhi IM). These IM subpopulations were phenotypically and functionally characterized in healthy adult blood by flow cytometry, migration assays and lipoprotein uptake assays. Their absolute numbers and proportions were then compared in blood samples from obese and non-obese adults. DRmid and DRhi IM differentially expressed several proteins including CD62L, CD11a, CX3CR1 and CCR2. Overall, the DRmid IM surface profile more closely resembled that of classical monocytes while DRhi IM were more similar to non-classical. However, in contrast to classical monocytes, DRmid IM migrated weakly to CCL2, had reduced intracellular calcium flux following CCR2 ligation and favored adherence to TNF-α-activated endothelium over transmigration. In lipid uptake assays, DRmid IM demonstrated greater internalization of oxidized and acetylated low density lipoprotein than DRhi IM. In obese compared to non-obese adults, proportions and absolute numbers of DRmid , but not DRhi IM, were increased in blood. The results are consistent with phenotypic and functional heterogeneity within the IM subset that may be of specific relevance to lipoprotein scavenging and metabolic health.

doi: 10.1111/imcb.12032. [Epub ahead of print]

NEPHSTROM research published in Frontiers in Immunology

 

The paper ‘Anti-Donor Immune Responses Elicited by Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Extracellular Vesicles: Are We Still Learning?’ is based on the work of Dr Paul Lohan, Dr Oliver Treacy, Prof Matthew Griffin, Prof Thomas Ritter and Dr Aideen Ryan of the National University of Ireland Galway. The publication appears in the November 24, 2017, edition of Frontiers in Immunology. This research was funded by NEPHSTROM, amongst other sources. Read the entire manuscript here.

Front. Immunol., 24 November 2017

https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2017.01626